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Mold & Stain Issues / Orange Mold
« Last post by PhilM on March 25, 2015, 11:46:26 AM »
QUESTION from the industry: Please see the photos. From what I have read this is Fusiform Rust, supposedly, through its growth cycle it is transferred from oaks, to pine, and back to oak.  The descriptions I have read all discuss this while it is still om the Pine, weather it is on the trunk, which seems to cause the most damage, and branches.  I am seeing an alarming amount come in on our KD19 "2 X" Pine, it sometimes there on delivery, and if we have rain or high humidity it gets out of control.  Now, it seems there is no solution, which I find difficult to believe, what worries me the most is, in the south, the Southern yellow Pine is of great importance in many aspects of our society. 

I have just read an article that states a blistering rust type mold/fungus has virtually rendered the White Pine of northwest United States and/or Canada a non-viable source in regards to any commercial uses.
Could this happen here, to Southern Yellow Pine?  And why does it seem there is no one who seems overly concerned of the potential loss of this tree, as it is grown, harvested, processed and sold for various end uses  in our region.  There are some states that have laws against harvesting and transporting this type infestation in an effort to have strong forests in the future.  I am unaware of any at this time.

ANSWER from Phil Mitchell Ph.D.: The orange mold shown in some photos is a surface mold that can grow on green lumber, air dried lumber, or even kiln dried lumber that is stored in warm and very humid conditions.  This fungus penetrates the sapwood, but discoloration is limited to the surface of softwoods.  Mold fungi do not rot the wood and have little effect on strength.  Some photographs show blue stain fungi which is a sap stain fungi.  Blue stain fungi do not rot the wood and have little effect on strength except that they may reduce toughness or shock resistance.  One photo shows what appears to be cotton between pieces.  These are actual fungal hyphae strands growing on the lumber surface in profusion.  I have seen this form quickly (within 24 hours after sawing and stacking) in the mid-south if drying is delayed during hot humid weather. 

The best prevention against these stain fungi and surface molds is to quickly process cut logs into lumber and get the lumber up on sticks and in the kiln.  Sometimes dip treatments are used to retard the development of surface stain, but such treatments cannot prevent stain developing on the interior of the piece.

Fusiform rust is a disease of living trees and as such does not attack lumber.  Control of fusiform rust is best accomplished by silivicultural treatments in the forests although fungicides can more practically be applied in nurseries.  A good web site from the Forest Service discusses these aspects of control:  http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/fidls/fusiform/fidl-fusi.htm
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Training / Events / Great Lakes Kiln Drying Association 2015 Spring Meeting
« Last post by admin on March 23, 2015, 09:00:43 AM »
Great Lakes Kiln Dryin Assosiation
2015 Spring Meeting
April 9th & 10th

Menominee Casion Resort
N277 Highway 47-55
Keshena, Wisconsin

Download brochure for more information
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General Discussion / Re: Southern Yellow Pine and Orange Mold Growth
« Last post by jeffgoldinersc on March 19, 2015, 04:47:08 AM »
Thank you for responding.  I agree that the moisture content was above 15% at some point or in the wood in order to begin its growth cycle.  I just know how to prevent the growth or if that is possible without drastically increasing processing costs.  We use 1" thick sticks in our pre-cut stacks and it seems to love the dark spaces between rows where mc is the highest.  Its nasty looking stuff and i do have pics if anyone would be interested in seeing them.

Thanks Again,

Jeff
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General Discussion / Re: Southern Yellow Pine and Orange Mold Growth
« Last post by admin on March 16, 2015, 09:20:37 AM »
The additional forum thread discussing this is located here: http://www.kilndrying.org/mold-and-stain-issues/2/mold-in-southern-yellow-pine/564/
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General Discussion / Re: Southern Yellow Pine and Orange Mold Growth
« Last post by MichaelM on March 14, 2015, 06:50:15 AM »
There is another forum thread with good info, you might look at that.  Mold comes in lots of different colors, depending on what's in your region so the orange color is probably not the issue.  If it is on lumber planed at 15%, then at some point that board was above 15% after planning (for example condensation within a package) or perhaps the board was adjacent to a wet board in the unit and the surface was wet enough for mold to grow.
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Mold & Stain Issues / Re: Mold in Southern Yellow Pine
« Last post by MichaelM on March 14, 2015, 06:49:22 AM »
There is another forum thread with good info, you might look at that.  Mold comes in lots of different colors, depending on what's in your region so the orange color is probably not the issue.  If it is on lumber planed at 15%, then at some point that board was above 15% after planning (for example condensation within a package) or perhaps the board was adjacent to a wet board in the unit and the surface was wet enough for mold to grow.
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General Discussion / Southern Yellow Pine and Orange Mold Growth
« Last post by jeffgoldinersc on March 13, 2015, 06:07:57 AM »
Hello, I am curious as to whether anyone has seen or experienced an orange type mold growing on Southern Yellow Pine?  It is very aggressive and seems to locate the moist portion of a piece of wood, but it will spread to areas with 15% or less mc.  I realize this is contrary to all literature but we experienced this last year and it has started again this season.  Thank you for any and all responses. 
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Job Postings / Dry End Superintendent - Thomaston, GA
« Last post by admin on March 11, 2015, 12:10:47 PM »
    Dry End Superintendent

    Tracking Code    893-057

    Job Description
    Interfor Corporation is a growth-oriented lumber company with operations in Canada and the United States.  The Company has annual production capacity of 3.1 billion board feet and offers one of the most diverse lines of lumber products to customers around the world. For more information about Interfor, visit our website at Interfor.

    Interfor is currently recruiting for a Dry End Superintendent for our operations in Thomaston, Georgia. The successful candidate will be an engaging safety leader who will manage a highly motivated team in a technical and fast-paced manufacturing environment. This position will be responsible for the safe and effective management of three areas – the planer, the dry kiln and the shipping department.

    Major Responsibilities:
    • Maintain the highest standards for safety performance and lead with an impeccable personal example and a well communicated vision.
    • Manage the planer mill, dry kiln, production coordination and shipping operations (safety, productivity, quality, costs and employee engagement).
    • Manage environmental activities including storm water outfalls, dust system, and process water.
    • Liaise with the sales department to ensure product alignment.
    • Lead the continuous improvement process by engaging and developing employees.
    • Partner with process control leadership to drive superior results in value creation.
    • Assist in maintenance prioritization and planning activities.
    • Manage departmental forecasts, budgets and spending.
    • Provide leadership and support for capital projects.

    Required Skills
    • Strong leadership and organizational skills
    • Strong analytical abilities and working knowledge of sawmill processes
    • Excellent interpersonal and communication skills and ability to work effectively in a highly interactive team environment
    • Detail and results oriented
    • Ability to function under pressure
    • Strong business focus and the ability to think tactically and strategically

    Required Experience
    • Thorough knowledge of lumber manufacturing including equipment and processes
    • Strong understanding of lumber products
    • Post-secondary education is preferred
    • Minimum 5 years of experience in sawmill and planer mill operations at the supervisor and/or superintendent level

    To express interest in this opportunity, please apply online at www.interfor.com/careers

    We appreciate the interest of all applicants, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

    All applicants offered a position must successfully complete a pre-employment drug test and background check.

    NOTE: Job postings on Kilndrying.org are provided as a free service. We do our best to keep all postings current. However, if you discover a job listed on our forum is no longer available, please send us a message to that effect and we will remove from the board. Thank you.[/list][/list][/list][/list]
    9
    General Discussion / Kiln supply duct temp
    « Last post by JustinC on March 06, 2015, 11:29:36 AM »
    I have one kiln that won't get to the supply duct temp set point. I usually run my supply duct at 500 degrees farenheight. This kiln tops out around 400 regaardless of fuel and I can't figure it out.
    10
    Training / Events / Kiln Drying of Hardwood Lumber Short Course
    « Last post by admin on March 03, 2015, 08:55:59 AM »
    Penn State Extension will be offering a 3-day Kiln Drying of Hardwood Lumber short course on June 2-4, 2015 at the Livestock Evaluation Center at 1494 West Pine Grove Rd, Pennsylvania Furnace, PA.

    This three-day workshop is designed for kiln operator trainees, plant managers, and supervisors who are looking to gain knowledge in the art and science of drying hardwood lumber.  No previous drying experience or training is necessary.

    The workshop will include lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises.  Participants will learn about wood-moisture relations, kiln operations, drying schedule preparation, lumber handling and storage, and much more.

    The cost is $350 to attend if registered by May 12th.  After May 12th the cost increases to $400.  The cost includes lunches and materials.  You may register online by visiting http://extension.psu.edu/courses/kiln-drying-of-hardwood-lumber on the web, or by calling Penn State Extension in Forest County at 814-755-3544.  Questions can be directed to Scott Weikert at 814-755-3544 or by email at sjw123@psu.edu.

    Penn State encourages individuals with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities.  If you anticipate needing special accommodations or have questions about the physical access provided, please contact Scott Weikert at 814-755-3544 in advance of your visit.
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