News: Kilndrying.org passes 100,000 total viewsFrench Language Discussion


Author Topic: Can Inline MC Data be used to find "Cold Spots" in Kilns?  (Read 1318 times)

Offline JMS

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Can Inline MC Data be used to find "Cold Spots" in Kilns?
« on: September 26, 2012, 02:46:00 PM »
How can inline moisture measurement data be used to characterize "cold spots" in a kiln?   

I would appreciate any feedback. 

Thanks


Linkback: http://www.kilndrying.org/moisture-variability/4/can-inline-mc-data-be-used-to-find-cold-spots-in-kilns/468/

Offline TimothyD

  • Forum Expert
  • Newbie
  • *****
  • Posts: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Can Inline MC Data be used to find "Cold Spots" in Kilns?
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2012, 09:57:16 AM »
How can inline moisture measurement data be used to characterize "cold spots" in a kiln?   

I would appreciate any feedback. 

Thanks

Hi JMS,

"Cold spots" in a kiln are characterized by a larger than "typical" or "normal" standard deviation.  If one's standard deviation of moisture content determined at the planer for a particular charge of lumber from a kiln has increased significantly, then one possibility is that the kiln may have developed a "cold spot", especially if the incoming lumber diet has not changed.

In order to detect this occurrence, one must be tracking the moisture content at the planer inline moisture measurement system on a "charge by charge" basis.  This is easily done with one of our systems; even if the packages coming in are not sequential from the same kiln or kiln charge, our tracking software can manage and segregate the data appropriately.  Comparing previous charge standard deviations from a baseline to current standard deviations will help easily identify when something is amiss.

Taking this one step further to aid in fault identification, one can track the location of each package in the kiln charge for multiple charges (3-5) and average the average MC of those 3-5 packages for each location, then compare these averages for all 3-5 charges to determine where inside the kiln the "cold spot" actually is located. This will greatly help in taking steps to either "fix" a critical system within the kiln, or modifying operational steps to further improve overall kiln charge variability.

Since running 3-5 charges through an under-performing kiln resuts in loss of opportunity cost, we recommend a regimented program where this type of analyses are performed on a continual basis; doing so creates a program that identifies drying issues in as fast a manner as possible and allows for a minimal of delay in fault identification and resolution.

Great question!

Offline JMS

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Re: Can Inline MC Data be used to find "Cold Spots" in Kilns?
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2012, 10:16:24 AM »
Timothy,

Thank you for this very helpful information.  I appreciate the feedback.
JMS 

Offline GeorgeCulp

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
Re: Can Inline MC Data be used to find "Cold Spots" in Kilns?
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2013, 07:53:31 AM »
Sorry to be so late to the party on this one but Timothy is absolutely dead on with what he is saying.

Yet, I will expand for a momnet on what he said above...

What you can learn from operating an inline meter system and in the way he describes gives you information that you cannont possibly get otherwise. You learn how widths dry differently, how lengths dry differently, etc. Which in turn will indicate how to mix and match your loads. And it will tell you where your "cold" spots are.

Think of it this way.... the inline system will show you how to eliminate and/or minimze variables in your drying... and that is the key to maximizing your drying quality.


Share via facebook Share via furl Share via linkedin Share via reddit Share via twitter

  Subject / Started by Replies / Views Last post
xx
Air-Drying Hardwood Lumber by H.E. "Hank" Stezler, Forestry State Specialist

Started by M Gallahar

1 Replies
524 Views
Last post April 25, 2014, 08:20:05 AM
by PaulBallard
xx
The "Weight" Method

Started by Neissa G

3 Replies
1177 Views
Last post September 03, 2013, 10:09:22 AM
by Neissa G
xx
drying 2" Douglas Fir to shop grade

Started by cork46

2 Replies
676 Views
Last post May 08, 2014, 11:07:38 AM
by cork46
xx
Investigation of Historic Equilibrium Moisture Content Data

Started by M Gallahar

0 Replies
13 Views
Last post November 24, 2014, 11:58:23 AM
by M Gallahar
 


Forum experts

MichaelM lmod MichaelM
Michael Milota Ph.D.
Professor
Oregon State University
READ BIO
PhilM lmod PhilM
Phil Mitchell Ph.D.
Forum Expert
North Carolina State University
READ BIO
PierreA lmod PierreA
Pierre Asselin ing.f.
Forum Expert
READ BIO
StavrosA lmod StavrosA
Stavros Avramidis Ph.D.
Professor
University of British Columbia
READ BIO
TimothyD lmod TimothyD
Timothy Duncan MBA
Engineering Manager
Wagner Meters
READ BIO

* Events


* Job Opportunities